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Hooker Distinguished Visiting Professor -Dylan Robinson

 

gather: a workshop on decolonizing writing forms

Monday January 15, 2:30 pm, BSB 108

Defining a decolonial politics of inscription necessitates moving beyond settler colonial logics of writing as well as the mere emphasis upon Indigenous citational community. In this workshop, we will discuss two essays by Dylan Robinson that examine how Indigenous concepts and an engagement with critical race and settler positionalities might impact the forms academic writing takes. More specifically, we will discuss how the polysemic Halq’emeylem words sqwálewel (thoughts, feelings) and xwélalà:m (listening, witnessing) might impact the creation of written spaces for gathering, and draw on the work of Indigenous artists/curators who employ Indigenous methodologies of visiting. We will question what forms of writing enable us to move beyond the colonial extraction of concepts and voices that writing habitually enacts. A decolonial politics of inscription asks that we reorient the page as a space where Indigenous epistemology, protocol, and legal orders might be witnessed, listened to, and felt.

 

Public lecture: shxwelítemelh totí:lt: Hungry States of Perception

Tuesday January 16, 7:30 pm, MDCL 1309

“shxwelítemelh” is the Halq’emeylem adjective for settler or white person’s methods/ways. It comes from the noun “xwelítem” (settler), a word that more specifically means “starving person”. The word speaks directly to the historical encounter between xwélméxw (Stó:lo people) and newcomers to S’olh Temexw (Stó:lo territories) during the gold rush. In 1858 thousands of men arrived in a bodily state of starvation, and also brought with them their hunger for gold. “shxwelítemelh” thus also more accurately means “a settler’s hungry orientation toward something.” My presentation examines settler colonial states of perception as states of starvation, and asks mores specifically how settlers might decolonize the ways they perceive the world around them.

 

Event poster